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PTFE Products
 

PTFE Properties

History
Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin is in a class of paraffinic polymers that have some or all of the hydrogen replaced by fluoride. The original PTFE resin was first discovered on April 6, 1938 by Dr Roy J. Plunkett. While working at DuPont's Jackson Laboratory in New Jersey on another project, Dr. Plunkett found that a frozen, compressed amount of tetrafluoroethylene gas had polymerized into a waxy white solid substance, forming polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). DuPont registered the original PTFE resin under the trademark Teflon® in 1945, and the first commercial products were sold under this trademark in 1946. Interestingly, PTFE was produced on a limited scale in the early 1940s, and was used shortly thereafter by the Manhattan Project in containers for highly corrosive elements during uranium separation experiments.op

PTFE Characteristics & Benefits
The extraordinary characteristics of PTFE make it the ideal choice in a wide range of products and applications. PTFE has a coefficient of friction that is one of the lowest of any material. PTFE is extremely abrasion resistant, making it adaptable to the harshest environments. In addition, PTFE can withstand a wide range of temperatures, from 260 Degrees Centigrade down to -270 Degrees Centigrade, and can even handle brief exposures at higher temperatures. PTFE also has excellent flame resistance due to its extremely high melting point, along with a very low rate of smoke generation and heat release. Another advantage of PTFE is that it is chemically inert and pure, and has no additional stabilizers, lubricants or plasticizers that would taint process fluids.

PTFE products have an extremely long service life, primarily due to PTFE retaining its original properties over a long period of time, even at extreme temperatures, in ultraviolet (UV) light, and when exposed to oils, oxidizing agents and solvents. PTFE also is extremely corrosion resistant, especially to acids, and harsh inorganic and organic chemicals. Additionally, the original properties PTFE remain the same even after extended time periods in water. Furthermore, PTFE is resistant to atmospheric aging in the form of discoloration, oxidation, and, as previously noted, is not affected by ultraviolet light
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PTFE Properties

Properties

ATM
Method

Units

Virgin PTFE

Reprocessed
PTFE

25% Glass
PTFE

Specific Gravity

D792

2.14-2.20

2.15-2.20

220-230

Tensile Strength

D638

PSI

1500-3500

1500-2400

2000-3000

Tensile Strength

D638

PSI

1500-3500

1500-2400

2000-3000

Elongation

D638

%

250-350

75-200

100-260

Hardness

D1700

Durometer "D"

50-60

N/A

55-65

Deformation %
73 0 F, 1500 psi, 24 hours

D621

N/A

4-8

N/A

1.73

Deformation %
100 0 F, 1500 psi, 24 hours

D621

N/A

10-18

N/A

1.91

Deformation %
200 0 F, 1500 psi, 24 hours

D621

N/A

20-25

N/A

4.57

Impact Strength,
Izod
730 0 F Average
170 0 F Average

D256

Ft./Lb./In.

3.00
6.00

N/A

2.54
3.69

Water Absorption

D570

%

0.001

N/A

0.013

Coefficient of Friction
(Static) 73 0 F

*3

N/A

0.04

N/A

0.085

Dielectric Constant
(100 CPS)

D150

N/A

2.00

2.26

2.4

Dielectric Strength (4) (air)

D257

Volts

1000

450

235

Coefficient of Thermal Expansion 73 0 F

D696

In./In./Ft.

5.5 x 10.3

N/A

2.75 x 10.3

Coefficient of Thermal Conductivity

*5

Btu/hr/ftz

1.7

N/A

3.12

PV at 900 ft./min

N/A

N/A

2500

N/A

15,000

Color

*6

N/A

white

off white

brownish white

Applications
The uses and applications of PTFE have grown enormously over the past 68 years. Probably one of the most famous uses for PTFE is as a non-stick coating found on cookware (again, under the Dupont Teflon® trademark). However, PTFE is used in the semiconductor, medical, chemical, automotive, electrical, aerospace, filtration, wire & cable as well as petrochemical industries.

  • Chemical processing and petrochemical sectors: used for vessel linings, seals, spacers, gaskets, well-drilling parts and washers, since PTFE is chemically inert and resistant to corrosion
  • Laboratory applications: Tubing, piping, containers and vessels due to resistance to chemicals and the absence of contaminants attaching to the surface of PTFE products
  • Electrical industry: used as an insulator in the form of spacers, tubing and the like
  • Virgin PTFE had been approved by the FDA for use in the pharmaceutical, beverage, food and cosmetics industries in the form of conveyor components, slides, guide rails, along with other parts used in ovens and other heated systems.
  • Semiconductor sector: used as an insulator in the production of discrete components such as capacitors and in the chip manufacturing process.

In many instances PTFE in it purest form is a perfect solution. However, when an application demands a modification to the basic PTFE chemistry, Plastomer Technologies can help satisfy a broader range of physical, thermal, or practical demands. Examples include glass or bronze fillers for added stiffness and strength, carbon fillers for conductivity, and moly blends for added lubricity.

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